10 ways we are playing our part

April 13, 2018 | Comment

The Minnesota Lottery helps make Minnesota an even better place to live—and it is fun! Money from lottery sales helps our environment and supports important state programs that benefit all Minnesotans. Of every dollar played, 92 cents is returned to Minnesotans in the form of prize money, retailer commissions and contributions to the state.

 

10 Minnesota Lottery Facts:

 

#10: 87,000 Winners a Day

Minnesota Lottery players have won more than $7 billion in prizes; in fact, there are 87,000 prizes paid every day.

 

#9: $1 Million Club

More than 140 prizes of $1 million or more have been won in Minnesota—including seven so far in 2018! Another 36 “lifetime” prizes have been won by Minnesota winners.  

 

#8: Nature Wins $1 Billion

The Minnesota Lottery is the primary contributor to the Minnesota Environment & Natural Resources Trust Fund, which has helped fund more than 1,000 projects throughout Minnesota. In 2017, The Minnesota Environment & Natural Resources Trust Fund hit an incredible milestone; the value of the fund surpassed $1 billion!

 

#7: Experiencing the Outdoors

Lottery dollars help foster a life-long love of Minnesota’s outdoors. ENRTF projects have helped provide outdoors education and given youth opportunities to experience outdoor activities like fishing, canoeing and camping.

 

#6: Protecting Pollinators

ENRTF projects are helping Minnesota’s native bees and butterflies, which play vital roles in pollinating agricultural crops and in supporting natural ecosystems, including prairies.

 

#5: Improving Water Quality

The ENRTF has supported numerous research initiatives aimed at protecting and improving the water quality of Minnesota’s lakes, rivers and streams. Some of these projects are helping to restore our native mussel population and fight invasive mussel species. Native mussels, which help cleanse the water they live in, are critically important to the health of Minnesota’s lakes and rivers.

 

#4: Improving Trails

More than half of Minnesota’s state trails have benefited from ENRTF investment, including the Gitchi-Gami State Trail in northeastern Minnesota, Gateway Trail and Brown’s Creek State Trail near the Twin Cities, Paul Bunyan State Trail in northern Minnesota, Casey Jones State Trail in southwestern Minnesota, Glacial Lakes State Trail in central Minnesota and Root River State Trail in southeastern Minnesota. 

 

#3: Fighting Invasive Species

ENRTF projects are helping to protect Minnesota prairies, lakes, rivers, forests and wetlands from invasive plant and pest species, including emerald ash borer, Eurasian Milfoil, Asian carp and zebra mussel. 

 

#2: Supporting Metropolitan Regional Parks

The ENRTF has supported the nationally renowned Twin Cities Metropolitan Regional Park and Trail System. Trust Fund grants have helped expand, manage, and develop the Twin Cities Metropolitan Regional Park and Trail System that provides outdoor recreation while preserving green space for wildlife habitat and other natural resource benefits. Some of the regional parks that have benefited from ENRTF investment including Minneapolis Chain of Lakes Regional Park in Hennepin County, Doyle‐Kennefick Regional Park in Scott County, Como Regional Park in Ramsey County, Lebanon Hills Regional Park in Dakota County, and Rice Creek Chain of Lakes Regional Park in Anoka County.

 

#1: Benefitting Minnesota’s State Parks

Minnesota’s State Park System permanently protects and provides public access to some of Minnesota’s most diverse, unique, and pristine natural landscapes. More than half of Minnesota’s State Parks have benefitted from the ENRTF, including Tettegouche State Park in Lake County, Big Bog State Recreation Area in Beltrami County, Whitewater State Park in Winona County, Interstate State Park in Chisago County, Minneopa State Park in Blue Earth County and Itasca State Park in Becker, Clearwater and Hubbard counties.

 

Click here to learn more about how lottery dollars are working for Minnesota.  

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